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New White Paper on Risk and Needs Assessments

NLADA and the American Council of Chief Defenders are proud to share the new white paper, “Risk & Needs Assessments: What Defenders and Chief Defenders Need to Know.”

This paper responds to the growing use of actuarial risk assessments and needs assessments to make decisions about persons at various stages of the criminal justice system. As the use of these assessments increases, particularly in pretrial detention determinations, clients will benefit from defenders who understand the science behind assessments, can advocate effectively for their use, and know how to argue for fidelity of the risk assessment tool.

$106 Million JPMorgan Chase Settlement Provides Legal Aid Funding Opportunity

Civil legal aid programs across the country have a great opportunity for new funding thanks to a settlement reached earlier this month.

As a result of investigations into JP Morgan Chase's practices of selling "zombie debt" and robo-signing court documents, the firm will pay $106 million to attorneys general in 47 states and the District of Columbia. Chase also will pay $50 million in consumer refunds and $30 million to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, as well as­ $30 million to the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency in a related action. 

Senator Booker Honored at Leadership Appreciation Luncheon

Senator Cory Booker of New Jersey received the Justice Through Government Service Award on June 24 at the NLADA Leadership Appreciation Luncheon. The award recognizes his key role in reforming the country’s criminal justice system and his promotion of public policies that benefit underserved populations throughout the nation.

A short introductory video helped define the landscape that Sen. Booker is reshaping. In it, he outlined the “jagged disparities” in the treatment of blacks and whites, and how those differences -- in sentencing for a single teenage offense, for example -- can damage a life for decades in crucial aspects of life such as education, housing, and employment.

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